The Studio Museum invites artists living or working in Harlem to join Director and Chief Curator Thelma Golden to review their work and discuss their artistic endeavors. From 12 to 3pm on Sunday, February 9, Golden will hold fifteen-minute meetings with ten artists selected through a lottery system. Activating artist Theaster Gates’s work See, Sit, Sup, Sip, Sing: Holding Court in the Studio Museum atrium, this event celebrates the exhibition Radical Presence: Black Performance and Contemporary Art and the Museum’s ongoing commitment to the Harlem arts community.
Each artist should submit their name, home or studio address in Harlem and phone number to holdingcourt@studiomuseum.org by 6pm on Friday, January 31, 2014. Individuals selected through the lottery will be informed via e-mail and given further instructions on Tuesday, February 4, 2014. Participants will be asked to prepare a current resume or CV, a maximum of 10 images (no original artwork) and an artist statement of 500 words or less.
Theaster Gates’s installation, See, Sit, Sup, Sip, Sing: Holding Court (2012) evokes a classroom that has been relocated to the Museum’s atrium. Created from tables, chairs and desks salvaged from a now-closed public school on Chicago’s South Side, this installation–much like a classroom–is designed as an experience for learning created by the people assembled in and around it.
Photo: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

The Studio Museum invites artists living or working in Harlem to join Director and Chief Curator Thelma Golden to review their work and discuss their artistic endeavors. From 12 to 3pm on Sunday, February 9, Golden will hold fifteen-minute meetings with ten artists selected through a lottery system. Activating artist Theaster Gates’s work See, Sit, Sup, Sip, Sing: Holding Court in the Studio Museum atrium, this event celebrates the exhibition Radical Presence: Black Performance and Contemporary Art and the Museum’s ongoing commitment to the Harlem arts community.

Each artist should submit their name, home or studio address in Harlem and phone number to holdingcourt@studiomuseum.org by 6pm on Friday, January 31, 2014. Individuals selected through the lottery will be informed via e-mail and given further instructions on Tuesday, February 4, 2014. Participants will be asked to prepare a current resume or CV, a maximum of 10 images (no original artwork) and an artist statement of 500 words or less.

Theaster Gates’s installation, See, Sit, Sup, Sip, Sing: Holding Court (2012) evokes a classroom that has been relocated to the Museum’s atrium. Created from tables, chairs and desks salvaged from a now-closed public school on Chicago’s South Side, this installation–much like a classroom–is designed as an experience for learning created by the people assembled in and around it.

Photo: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

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schomburgcenter:

Don’t miss the opportunity to visit the Schomburg Center to check out our current exhibitions: Schomburg Collects WPA Artists 1935-1943; Claiming Citizenship; A Lighthouse in New York, and Breaking the Barriers.
All of our exhibitions are free and open to the public Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Learn More!
Photo Caption: Schomburg Society members getting an exclusive preview of Schomburg Collects WPA Artists  on September 4, 2013. 
Photo Credit: Bob Gore

schomburgcenter:

Don’t miss the opportunity to visit the Schomburg Center to check out our current exhibitions: Schomburg Collects WPA Artists 1935-1943; Claiming Citizenship; A Lighthouse in New York, and Breaking the Barriers.

All of our exhibitions are free and open to the public Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Learn More!

Photo Caption: Schomburg Society members getting an exclusive preview of Schomburg Collects WPA Artists  on September 4, 2013. 

Photo Credit: Bob Gore

Schomburg Center Harlem New York

Applications are now live for the next cycle of Expanding the Walls! 

Expanding the Walls (ETW) is a deeply engaging photography based program that uses the work of renowned photographer James VanDerZee as a catalyst for discussion and art-making.  ETW participants work with a diverse group of arts professionals to explore issues related to community, history and culture while learning the basics of photography.  The program ends with an exhibition of student and VanDerZee photographs in The Studio Museum’s galleries. To learn more visit: http://www.studiomuseum.org/learn/expanding-the-walls/2014 

Do you have what it takes to join next year’s ETW crew? Apply here.

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Justine Reyes, Thank you, Thank you, Thank you, On Gratitude, 2013
Born 1978, Upland, CALives and works in New York, NY

This image is part of a series of photograms titled “On Gratitude,” where I simply lay bags down on photographic paper, allowing the imprint of the bag to be made as light passes through it. In the darkroom I have created rich, deep colors and jewel-like tones to create the feeling of a precious object and play on the idea of turning trash into treasure.This bag was found in Harlem, near Lenox Ave. and 123rd St. Growing up in NYC, I’ve watched Harlem change throughout the years. Large chain stores are increasingly replacing locally owned businesses, and the bags that I have been collecting are also disappearing with the influx of these corporate retailers. In an effort to “go green,” these bags are being phased out of use and slowly they will eventually disappear from our daily lives. I want to create a record of these disappearing objects, which are so tied to American consumer culture.

Justine Reyes, Thank you, Thank you, Thank you, On Gratitude, 2013

Born 1978, Upland, CA
Lives and works in New York, NY

This image is part of a series of photograms titled “On Gratitude,” where I simply lay bags down on photographic paper, allowing the imprint of the bag to be made as light passes through it. In the darkroom I have created rich, deep colors and jewel-like tones to create the feeling of a precious object and play on the idea of turning trash into treasure.

This bag was found in Harlem, near Lenox Ave. and 123rd St. Growing up in NYC, I’ve watched Harlem change throughout the years. Large chain stores are increasingly replacing locally owned businesses, and the bags that I have been collecting are also disappearing with the influx of these corporate retailers. In an effort to “go green,” these bags are being phased out of use and slowly they will eventually disappear from our daily lives. I want to create a record of these disappearing objects, which are so tied to American consumer culture.


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Paulette Henk, Church of Mama, 2013
Expanding the Walls participant, born 1996Fiorello H. Laguardia High School, New York, NY

Church of Mama is a photograph of artwork I’ve encountered many times while walking through the streets of Harlem. Harlem is especially important to me as an artist because it is a hub of culture and architecture and is, by my own definition, a colorful area of inspiration. The street vendors making their living in Harlem sell these beautiful pieces of artwork that may not have been recognized by the professional art world. These artists work to produce ideas that sometimes do not make it into museums, and are in return giving those walking by on their way to a work a quick art gallery show. There is much to be discovered in the art world, and it is a privilege to walk through the streets of Harlem and encounter such beautiful pieces of work out in the open. 

Paulette Henk, Church of Mama, 2013

Expanding the Walls participant, born 1996
Fiorello H. Laguardia High School, New York, NY

Church of Mama is a photograph of artwork I’ve encountered many times while walking through the streets of Harlem. Harlem is especially important to me as an artist because it is a hub of culture and architecture and is, by my own definition, a colorful area of inspiration. The street vendors making their living in Harlem sell these beautiful pieces of artwork that may not have been recognized by the professional art world. These artists work to produce ideas that sometimes do not make it into museums, and are in return giving those walking by on their way to a work a quick art gallery show. There is much to be discovered in the art world, and it is a privilege to walk through the streets of Harlem and encounter such beautiful pieces of work out in the open. 

art paulette henk harlem postcards harlem new york church

We’re thrilled to announce the 2013-14 Artists in Residence: http://bit.ly/16w1uoL

Kevin Beasley
Bethany Collins
Abigail DeVille

The Artist-in-Residence program was conceived at the Museum’s founding in 1968 and has supported more than one hundred graduates who have gone on to highly regarded careers. Every year, the Museum offers twelve-month studio residencies for three emerging artists. Each artist is granted a free studio space on the Museum’s third floor, a $20,000 fellowship and a $1,000 materials stipend. The program is designed to serve emerging artists of African and Latino descent, working across all media, locally, nationally and internationally.

Images (top to bottom): Abigail DeVille, Haarlem Tower of Babel, 2012. Photo: Adam Reich, Bethany Collins, “Do People Ever Think You’re White?” III, 2012. Courtesy the artist, Kevin Beasley, Untitled (Helmet), 2011. Courtesy the artist

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