schomburgcenter
schomburgcenter:

Join us Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 6:30pm for Visually Speaking: A Worldview from Guyana.
Many contemporary depictions of Guyana and its people—whether via the image or the written word—continue to center on the exotic, the colonial, and the touristic. Award-winning photographers Nikki Kahn and Keisha Scarville will share their artistic visions and portfolios and explore their ongoing work to tell Guyana’s stories and to counter historic and contemporary stereotypes about the former British colony and its wide-reaching Diaspora.
For more information and to RSVP, click here. 

schomburgcenter:

Join us Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 6:30pm for Visually Speaking: A Worldview from Guyana.

Many contemporary depictions of Guyana and its people—whether via the image or the written word—continue to center on the exotic, the colonial, and the touristic. Award-winning photographers Nikki Kahn and Keisha Scarville will share their artistic visions and portfolios and explore their ongoing work to tell Guyana’s stories and to counter historic and contemporary stereotypes about the former British colony and its wide-reaching Diaspora.

For more information and to RSVP, click here

unforgettingla

unforgettingla:

Documentation of artist Senga Nengudi’s “Ceremony for Freeway Fets,” an improvised performance that took place under a freeway overpass on Pico Boulevard in 1978. She’s been on our worklist for months and we’re happy to see that someone has started her page.

You can help by continuing to develop it. There’s plenty of great information about Nengudi and the Studio Z collective available at the African American Performance Art Archive.

Photos: Senga Nengudi, Ceremony for Freeway Fets, March 1978. © Senga Nengudi.


Postcard from… Joshua Tree by Tim Walker



Along a dirt road in the Mojave Desert just outside Joshua Tree is one of the world’s weirdest sculpture parks. The Outdoor Desert Art Museum of Assemblage Sculpture was created on this seven-half acre square of sand and brush by the African-American artist Noah Purifoy, who moved here from LA in the late 1980s.Scattered across the land in an order indiscernible except, perhaps, to their creator are a strange and alluring artworks made from found materials. Purifoy welded, nailed and otherwise cobbled together bowling balls and bicycles, train tracks and toilet bowls on this site between 1989 and 2004, when he died aged 86.The museum has a post-apocalyptic feel, like somewhere Mad Max might encounter a desert soothsayer or a gang of psychopathic bikers. There’s no entry fee, and no security guards. The sand and the blue sky turn even the most bizarre works to Instagram gold.Purifoy made his name constructing sculptures from the detritus of the Watts Riots in 1965, and some of the works here are similarly resonant: a toilet bowl sits next to a drinking fountain in “White/Coloured”.The installation “Shelter” was built from salvaged scraps of a neighbour’s house that burned down.






Image: "From the Point of View of the Little People," an assemblage by Noah Purifoy, is at the Noah Purifoy Outdoor Desert Art Museum in Joshua Tree, Calif.
Noah Purifoy’s Desert Art Museum is currently on view in When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South.

Postcard from… Joshua Tree by Tim Walker

Along a dirt road in the Mojave Desert just outside Joshua Tree is one of the world’s weirdest sculpture parks. The Outdoor Desert Art Museum of Assemblage Sculpture was created on this seven-half acre square of sand and brush by the African-American artist Noah Purifoy, who moved here from LA in the late 1980s.

Scattered across the land in an order indiscernible except, perhaps, to their creator are a strange and alluring artworks made from found materials. Purifoy welded, nailed and otherwise cobbled together bowling balls and bicycles, train tracks and toilet bowls on this site between 1989 and 2004, when he died aged 86.

The museum has a post-apocalyptic feel, like somewhere Mad Max might encounter a desert soothsayer or a gang of psychopathic bikers. There’s no entry fee, and no security guards. The sand and the blue sky turn even the most bizarre works to Instagram gold.

Purifoy made his name constructing sculptures from the detritus of the Watts Riots in 1965, and some of the works here are similarly resonant: a toilet bowl sits next to a drinking fountain in “White/Coloured”.

The installation “Shelter” was built from salvaged scraps of a neighbour’s house that burned down.

Image: "From the Point of View of the Little People," an assemblage by Noah Purifoy, is at the Noah Purifoy Outdoor Desert Art Museum in Joshua Tree, Calif.

Noah Purifoy’s Desert Art Museum is currently on view in When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South.

Pre-K teachers are invited to a FREE professional development day inspired by the exhibition Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series. Teachers will participate in a guided tour and hands-on workshop experience, focused on exploring the roles imagination, narrative and identity play in the classroom.Participants will gather museum tools and resources that connect to the New York State Pre-Kindergarten Foundation to the Common Core Standards. Don’t miss the chance to learn about resources for educators, upcoming programs and opportunities for your school or early childhood center!Professional Development for Pre-K-12 Educators is FREE but RSVP is required: http://bit.ly/1dMnv7o. Space is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Breakfast and refreshments will be provided.Image: Carrie Mae Weems, Project Row Houses (from “The Museum Series”), 2006–present

Pre-K teachers are invited to a FREE professional development day inspired by the exhibition Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series. Teachers will participate in a guided tour and hands-on workshop experience, focused on exploring the roles imagination, narrative and identity play in the classroom.

Participants will gather museum tools and resources that connect to the New York State Pre-Kindergarten Foundation to the Common Core Standards. Don’t miss the chance to learn about resources for educators, upcoming programs and opportunities for your school or early childhood center!

Professional Development for Pre-K-12 Educators is FREE but RSVP is required: http://bit.ly/1dMnv7o

Space is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Breakfast and refreshments will be provided.

Image: Carrie Mae Weems, Project Row Houses (from “The Museum Series”), 2006–present

blakegopnik
blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC, Whitney Biennial edition:  This 2008 portrait of Barrack Obama, by Dawoud Bey, is the opening image on the fourth floor of the Whitney Biennial, where many art lovers begin their visit to the show. (The Daily Pic will linger at the Biennial for  all of this week.) There’s so much packed into this single work that it makes almost all the art that comes after seem thin and wan.
Bey’s portrait stands as a kind of “full-disclosure” moment for an art world whose politics are almost universally progressive. Better for a show to wear those politics on its sleeve than to pretend to be apolitical.
It broaches the issues of race that still reach so deep into the American psyche. It’s a portrait by a fine African American artist of a great black hero – who happens to have as much white “blood” as black.  The portrait is neutral enough that it refuses to make blackness its overt subject, even while blackness, in all its infernal complexity, is inevitably central to how we read it.
In a Biennial that’s full of fancy aesthetic footwork, the Bey makes clear how much a straightforward representation can still do for us, if only by pointing a finger at what matters in the world. Great art, you could say, is 99% ostension, 1% inspiration. Of course, some subjects that art points to have more packed into them than others. I can hardly imagine any subject more meaning-filled than an image of the country’s first black president,  captured at a hopeful moment when he was still just an inspired candidate, and before the unprecedented dysfunctions of our second Gilded Age had not fully revealed themselves to him or us. Part of the greatness of Bey’s photo lies in how it refuses to live up to the cliches that insist that every portrait should reveal the essence of its sitter. The portrait stands for Barack Obama, and all that he means, without making claims about who he “really” is and what we are supposed to feel about him. (Courtesy Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago, ©Dawoud Bey)
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC, Whitney Biennial edition:  This 2008 portrait of Barrack Obama, by Dawoud Bey, is the opening image on the fourth floor of the Whitney Biennial, where many art lovers begin their visit to the show. (The Daily Pic will linger at the Biennial for  all of this week.) There’s so much packed into this single work that it makes almost all the art that comes after seem thin and wan.

Bey’s portrait stands as a kind of “full-disclosure” moment for an art world whose politics are almost universally progressive. Better for a show to wear those politics on its sleeve than to pretend to be apolitical.

It broaches the issues of race that still reach so deep into the American psyche. It’s a portrait by a fine African American artist of a great black hero – who happens to have as much white “blood” as black.  The portrait is neutral enough that it refuses to make blackness its overt subject, even while blackness, in all its infernal complexity, is inevitably central to how we read it.

In a Biennial that’s full of fancy aesthetic footwork, the Bey makes clear how much a straightforward representation can still do for us, if only by pointing a finger at what matters in the world. Great art, you could say, is 99% ostension, 1% inspiration. Of course, some subjects that art points to have more packed into them than others. I can hardly imagine any subject more meaning-filled than an image of the country’s first black president,  captured at a hopeful moment when he was still just an inspired candidate, and before the unprecedented dysfunctions of our second Gilded Age had not fully revealed themselves to him or us. Part of the greatness of Bey’s photo lies in how it refuses to live up to the cliches that insist that every portrait should reveal the essence of its sitter. The portrait stands for Barack Obama, and all that he means, without making claims about who he “really” is and what we are supposed to feel about him. (Courtesy Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago, ©Dawoud Bey)

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.