In honor of the major group exhibition The Shadows Took Shape, please join The Studio Museum in Harlem for a new series of book club discussions moderated by prominent artists, scholars, and bloggers interested in science fiction and speculative literature. Filmmaker and documentarian M. Asli Dukan and artist and literary scholar Rosamond S. King will lead a discussion that delves into the book’s themes of social class, gender and identity.
In Brown Girl in the Ring, the rich and privileged have fled the city, barricaded it behind roadblocks, and left it to crumble. The inner city has had to rediscover old ways-farming, barter, herb lore. But now the monied need a harvest of bodies, and so they prey upon the helpless of the streets. With nowhere to turn, a young woman must open herself to ancient truths, eternal powers, and the tragic mystery surrounding her mother and grandmother. She must bargain with gods, and give birth to new legends.
M. Asli Dukan is a producer, director and editor currently living in New York City. She is in post-production on the feature length documentary, Invisible Universe which explores the history of African American images in fantasy, horror and science fiction literature and film and is in development on the feature length anthology horror film, Skin Folk based on the book by the award winning science fiction writer, Nalo Hopkinson.
Rosamond S. King, Ph.D. is a critical and creative writer and artist teaching in the English Department at Brooklyn College. Her book Island Bodies: Transgressive Sexualities in the Caribbean Imagination is forthcoming from the University Press of Florida, and her scholarly work on Caribbean and African literature, sexuality, and performance has been widely published.  Her poetry appears in more than a dozen books and journals, and her art has been exhibited around the world; new work was recently commissioned by the African Performance Art Biennale. She has received numerous honors, including a Fulbright Award and fellowships from Poets House and the Woodrow Wilson, Mellon and Ford Foundations.
Additional scheduled Book Club dates:January 26: Samuel R. Delany, Nova (1968)February 23: Colson Whitehead, The Intuitionist (1999)March 6: Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man (1952)
All of the books listed above are available in the Studio Museum bookstore!
To RSVP for the Book Club, please email rsvp@studiomuseum.org.

In honor of the major group exhibition The Shadows Took Shape, please join The Studio Museum in Harlem for a new series of book club discussions moderated by prominent artists, scholars, and bloggers interested in science fiction and speculative literature. Filmmaker and documentarian M. Asli Dukan and artist and literary scholar Rosamond S. King will lead a discussion that delves into the book’s themes of social class, gender and identity.

In Brown Girl in the Ring, the rich and privileged have fled the city, barricaded it behind roadblocks, and left it to crumble. The inner city has had to rediscover old ways-farming, barter, herb lore. But now the monied need a harvest of bodies, and so they prey upon the helpless of the streets. With nowhere to turn, a young woman must open herself to ancient truths, eternal powers, and the tragic mystery surrounding her mother and grandmother. She must bargain with gods, and give birth to new legends.

M. Asli Dukan is a producer, director and editor currently living in New York City. She is in post-production on the feature length documentary, Invisible Universe which explores the history of African American images in fantasy, horror and science fiction literature and film and is in development on the feature length anthology horror film, Skin Folk based on the book by the award winning science fiction writer, Nalo Hopkinson.

Rosamond S. King, Ph.D. is a critical and creative writer and artist teaching in the English Department at Brooklyn College. Her book Island Bodies: Transgressive Sexualities in the Caribbean Imagination is forthcoming from the University Press of Florida, and her scholarly work on Caribbean and African literature, sexuality, and performance has been widely published.  Her poetry appears in more than a dozen books and journals, and her art has been exhibited around the world; new work was recently commissioned by the African Performance Art Biennale. She has received numerous honors, including a Fulbright Award and fellowships from Poets House and the Woodrow Wilson, Mellon and Ford Foundations.

Additional scheduled Book Club dates:
January 26: Samuel R. Delany, Nova (1968)
February 23: Colson Whitehead, The Intuitionist (1999)
March 6: Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man (1952)

All of the books listed above are available in the Studio Museum bookstore!

To RSVP for the Book Club, please email rsvp@studiomuseum.org.

Lit nalo hopkinson afrofuturism studio museum studio museum in harlem

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    Nalo Hopkins is a genius.
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  11. martinbisceglia said: Hi! my name is Martin Bisceglia, i’m a young painter and engraver from Argentina. If you like, you can check out my tumblr and see some of my work. martinbisceglia.tumblr.com
  12. ameliaslunchbox said: Seeing this exhibit on Sunday. Can’t wait!
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