Pre-K teachers are invited to a FREE professional development day inspired by the exhibition Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series. Teachers will participate in a guided tour and hands-on workshop experience, focused on exploring the roles imagination, narrative and identity play in the classroom.Participants will gather museum tools and resources that connect to the New York State Pre-Kindergarten Foundation to the Common Core Standards. Don’t miss the chance to learn about resources for educators, upcoming programs and opportunities for your school or early childhood center!Professional Development for Pre-K-12 Educators is FREE but RSVP is required: http://bit.ly/1dMnv7o. Space is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Breakfast and refreshments will be provided.Image: Carrie Mae Weems, Project Row Houses (from “The Museum Series”), 2006–present

Pre-K teachers are invited to a FREE professional development day inspired by the exhibition Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series. Teachers will participate in a guided tour and hands-on workshop experience, focused on exploring the roles imagination, narrative and identity play in the classroom.

Participants will gather museum tools and resources that connect to the New York State Pre-Kindergarten Foundation to the Common Core Standards. Don’t miss the chance to learn about resources for educators, upcoming programs and opportunities for your school or early childhood center!

Professional Development for Pre-K-12 Educators is FREE but RSVP is required: http://bit.ly/1dMnv7o

Space is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Breakfast and refreshments will be provided.

Image: Carrie Mae Weems, Project Row Houses (from “The Museum Series”), 2006–present

You know, those of us involved in the afrofuturist debate feel partly responsible for the coming of the afropolitic. I want to try and rescue something from it, for a minute, by returning to that debate on “futurority” which afrofuturism is about. If you remember… neither term, either afro or futurist, were indeed new.
John Akomfrah, Manifesa #17: Raimi Gbadamosi talks with John Akomfrah on Contemporary&
blakegopnik
blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC, Whitney Biennial edition:  This 2008 portrait of Barrack Obama, by Dawoud Bey, is the opening image on the fourth floor of the Whitney Biennial, where many art lovers begin their visit to the show. (The Daily Pic will linger at the Biennial for  all of this week.) There’s so much packed into this single work that it makes almost all the art that comes after seem thin and wan.
Bey’s portrait stands as a kind of “full-disclosure” moment for an art world whose politics are almost universally progressive. Better for a show to wear those politics on its sleeve than to pretend to be apolitical.
It broaches the issues of race that still reach so deep into the American psyche. It’s a portrait by a fine African American artist of a great black hero – who happens to have as much white “blood” as black.  The portrait is neutral enough that it refuses to make blackness its overt subject, even while blackness, in all its infernal complexity, is inevitably central to how we read it.
In a Biennial that’s full of fancy aesthetic footwork, the Bey makes clear how much a straightforward representation can still do for us, if only by pointing a finger at what matters in the world. Great art, you could say, is 99% ostension, 1% inspiration. Of course, some subjects that art points to have more packed into them than others. I can hardly imagine any subject more meaning-filled than an image of the country’s first black president,  captured at a hopeful moment when he was still just an inspired candidate, and before the unprecedented dysfunctions of our second Gilded Age had not fully revealed themselves to him or us. Part of the greatness of Bey’s photo lies in how it refuses to live up to the cliches that insist that every portrait should reveal the essence of its sitter. The portrait stands for Barack Obama, and all that he means, without making claims about who he “really” is and what we are supposed to feel about him. (Courtesy Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago, ©Dawoud Bey)
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC, Whitney Biennial edition:  This 2008 portrait of Barrack Obama, by Dawoud Bey, is the opening image on the fourth floor of the Whitney Biennial, where many art lovers begin their visit to the show. (The Daily Pic will linger at the Biennial for  all of this week.) There’s so much packed into this single work that it makes almost all the art that comes after seem thin and wan.

Bey’s portrait stands as a kind of “full-disclosure” moment for an art world whose politics are almost universally progressive. Better for a show to wear those politics on its sleeve than to pretend to be apolitical.

It broaches the issues of race that still reach so deep into the American psyche. It’s a portrait by a fine African American artist of a great black hero – who happens to have as much white “blood” as black.  The portrait is neutral enough that it refuses to make blackness its overt subject, even while blackness, in all its infernal complexity, is inevitably central to how we read it.

In a Biennial that’s full of fancy aesthetic footwork, the Bey makes clear how much a straightforward representation can still do for us, if only by pointing a finger at what matters in the world. Great art, you could say, is 99% ostension, 1% inspiration. Of course, some subjects that art points to have more packed into them than others. I can hardly imagine any subject more meaning-filled than an image of the country’s first black president,  captured at a hopeful moment when he was still just an inspired candidate, and before the unprecedented dysfunctions of our second Gilded Age had not fully revealed themselves to him or us. Part of the greatness of Bey’s photo lies in how it refuses to live up to the cliches that insist that every portrait should reveal the essence of its sitter. The portrait stands for Barack Obama, and all that he means, without making claims about who he “really” is and what we are supposed to feel about him. (Courtesy Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago, ©Dawoud Bey)

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

thehammermuseum

manpodcast:

The Hammer Museum recently opened a major historical survey titled "Take It or Leave It: Institution, Image, Ideology." It describes the show as “the first large-scale exhibition to focus on the intersection of two vitally important genres of contemporary art: appropriation (taking and recasting existing images, forms, and styles from mass-media and fine art sources) and institutional critique (scrutinizing and confronting the structures and practices of our social, cultural, and political institutions).”

One of the artists in the exhibition is Fred Wilson, the New York-based conceptualist whose work often examines how people of color are represented in the historical record — and by the institutions that help write that record. Wilson was the guest on Episode No. 33 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast, a program taped live at the Toledo Museum of Art. On the occasion of the Hammer show, we’ve added it to our SoundCloud page. Have a listen, or download it using the button in the upper right above!

Subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.

Image: Fred Wilson, To Die Upon a Kiss, 2011. Collection of the Detroit Institute of Arts.